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STREET DISCIPLE: Kofi Mole.

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In an Abelenkpe-bound Uber cab, rapper Kofi Mole who, due to his bleached dreadlocks and silvery braces, evokes a young Lil Wayne, holds his smartphone to his ear, mumbling half-finished melody over dance-ready instrumentation pouring from the phone’s speaker. Covering his upper body is a Calvin Klein polo shirt, his lower body clothed in tight black jeans ripped at the knees. For footwear, he has selected black and white Vans sneakers. Watching him from my spot next to him in the backseat of the speeding little car, I nod at his method (eyes closed, hands slapping imaginary objects), which is apparently common with musicians. Also in the vehicle is his road manager, also a dreadlocked dark man trading by the alias Dat Boy GH.

Mole is cut from hip-hop’s cloth, and commands mammoth young fandom usually collected under the social movement called “GroundUp Chale.” His mainstream ascendance came via the Kwesi Arthur—assisted “Mensah,” a galvanizing 2018 outliers’ anthem. Other auditory performances, including his lyrical fineness on “Bibii Ba,” a Sarkodie-curated assemblage of emerging rhymesters, was further argument for his demand to not be overlooked as incoming hip-hop Ali.

And yet, Mole is also the man behind “Don’t Be Late,” a track many considered “off-brand” Produced by Kobby Jay and taken from his freshly-published Aposor Love EP, that record is an aching number of unanswered love that quickly became an unquestionable staple. It is where our conversation begins when we arrive at his Abelenkpe location, a warehouse that also lodges his personal recording studio.

“Ebe real-life story,” he begins,” resorting to his preferred Pidgin English as he collapses into a leather couch, “but the beat be hip-hop,” he says, referring to the song’s kick sequence. Dat Boy slumps unto the couch too, and in seconds, is fast asleep from exhaustion.

On his choice of subject and articulation medium for “Don’t Be Late,” the soft-spoken rapper christened Edward Kofi Agyemang Amoah explains—his voice strained from a long day of media rounds, that when he received the beat, he was was indeed experiencing emotional yearning of an amorous nature. “Then I dey want make people get the story well, that be why I put am for singing inside. If you dey sing with melodies, people dey barb am quick.”

It is all the detail he is willing to surrender, and I have no intention of pushing it. I, therefore, promptly steer the conversation away from akoma sentiments, so a more bellicose picking: the phenomenon of street, for which his fans have oiled him the role of ambassador. Our near-hour conversation orbits this conception that enjoys such a glorified personality among a wide section of the country’s youth.  

Appropriated from western urban culture, the term may broadly refer to credibility that attends hustling by ANY MEANS NECESSARY. In rap music everywhere, it appears that one shall only be rewarded with success and fame if one can demonstrate that he has been through the mill known as the street.

In an Abelenkpe-bound Uber cab, rapper Kofi Mole who, due to his bleached dreadlocks and silvery braces, evokes a young Lil Wayne, holds his smartphone to his ear, mumbling half-finished melody over dance-ready instrumentation pouring from the phone’s speaker. Covering his upper body is a Calvin Klein polo shirt, his lower body clothed in tight black jeans ripped at the knees. For footwear, he has selected black and white Vans sneakers. Watching him from my spot next to him in the backseat of the speeding little car, I nod at his method (eyes closed, hands slapping imaginary objects), which is apparently common with musicians. Also in the vehicle is his road manager, also a dreadlocked dark man trading by the alias Dat Boy GH.

Mole is cut from hip-hop’s cloth, and commands mammoth young fandom usually collected under the social movement called “GroundUp Chale.” His mainstream ascendance came via the Kwesi Arthur—assisted “Mensah,” a galvanizing 2018 outliers’ anthem. Other auditory performances, including his lyrical fineness on “Bibii Ba,” a Sarkodie-curated assemblage of emerging rhymesters, was further argument for his demand to not be overlooked as incoming hip-hop Ali.

And yet, Mole is also the man behind “Don’t Be Late,” a track many considered “off-brand” Produced by Kobby Jay and taken from his freshly-published Aposor Love EP, that record is an aching number of unanswered love that quickly became an unquestionable staple. It is where our conversation begins when we arrive at his Abelenkpe location, a warehouse that also lodges his personal recording studio.

“Ebe real-life story,” he begins,” resorting to his preferred Pidgin English as he collapses into a leather couch, “but the beat be hip-hop,” he says, referring to the song’s kick sequence. Dat Boy slumps unto the couch too, and in seconds, is fast asleep from exhaustion.

On his choice of subject and articulation medium for “Don’t Be Late,” the soft-spoken rapper christened Edward Kofi Agyemang Amoah explains—his voice strained from a long day of media rounds, that when he received the beat, he was was indeed experiencing emotional yearning of an amorous nature. “Then I dey want make people get the story well, that be why I put am for singing inside. If you dey sing with melodies, people dey barb am quick.”

 It is all the detail he is willing to surrender, and I have no intention of pushing it. I, therefore, promptly steer the conversation away from akoma sentiments, so a more bellicose picking: the phenomenon of street, for which his fans have oiled him the role of ambassador. Our near-hour conversation orbits this conception that enjoys such a glorified personality among a wide section of the country’s youth.  

Appropriated from western urban culture, the term may broadly refer to credibility that attends hustling by ANY MEANS NECESSARY. In rap music everywhere, it appears that one shall only be rewarded with success and fame if one can demonstrate that he has been through the mill known as the street.  

Young Mole, who also responds to the sobriquet “Aposor Gangster,” after a tight-gripping forest dweller, begins his response by disabusing misconceptions that the term has suffered for years. “Eno be anything huhuuhu biaa,” he assures, smiling slightly. “If you talk say street: ebi somebody who dey hustle on ihn own to make a living. You still dey link up with your parents and things but you no dey depend on them…you still dey fit go to town go work then make money, take care of yourself, get things wey your parents not fit afford give you.”

“Street”—the version he subscribes to, at least—does not involve violence. It’s about love and brotherhood: “holding each other down,” and peace, not “gidigidi.”

Also, the concept, per the lecture Mole generously doles out to me, exists everywhere—not just the fabled impoverished suburbs of Nima, or Russia, or Sukura. Even in the privileged blocks of East Legon, “street” is fiercely represented. A chuckle accompanies this last opinion.  Some people, he notes, are simply drawn to the street life they have observed from afar; drawn to the grass-to-grace narrative that street life typifies.  Street represents ambition and an unflinching commitment to that aim. Say a person’s dream car is a Jeep Wrangler, he must cater to that dream with utmost dedication till it is realized. Why?  The street is one’s oyster; home to boundless entrepreneurial opportunities.

Mole also offers perspective on “hustle, (with which “street” are never mutually exclusive and can even operate interchangeably). It is a way of earning a living, he says, “…doing something wey go fetch you money—that be hustle. Wey nobody go fit live without hustle—unless your people get the money put down give you…ihn sef, if you no hustle the money go fini then things, so hustle deɛ ebe life requirement everybody for hustle.”

Hailing from Kumasi in Ghana’s Ashanti Region, Mole is alumnus of the Armed Forces Senior High Technical School for his secondary education. While in Level 300, reading Psychology at the University of Ghana, Mole deferred his course to concentrate fully on his music career, (a decision his father didn’t take kindly to). He insists, though, that hustling can happen alongside school. “You fit dey the street and dey go school alongside.”

On the hustle field, Mole’s credibility is intact, he’ll have you know. He’s “paid his dues.” As he says this, one gets the sense that hailing from a modest home, and having dealt in second-hand clothing at Kantamanto since 2007 to support himself, coupled with now being the source of succour for his compatriots who are still navigating a life bereft of sufficient options has something to do with it. More importantly, the rapper recognizes his current clout on the streets as a result of his current vocation, hence his being particular about his public conduct and utterances.

“I no dey talk to people one-on-one, I dey talk to people through my music. Music be very powerful thing, so I be very careful of every lyric I put out, so I go bring positive impact for people demma lives inside, so my words deɛ I be very careful.

This does not present any weight he did not envisage, he tells me. Rather, in a way, it is a dream come true: “E be something I dream of, say I go come get that platform wey if I talk, I get majority of people wey dey listen to me. I dey deal with am cool.”

Contrary to the strategy of many of his peers, Mole published a ten-track mixtape right out of the gate. His reason: one’s total essence cannot be conveyed in a single song. It can only be achieved with a complete folder comprising the artist’s varying creative prongs. Spread the News, as the body of work is titled, embodies this abundantly. Moreover, the street boy that he is, Mole wanted people to testify to his hard work. He wanted to send a direct message:

 “We be that guys wey, if we get chance for the industry, we go fit drop albums and things. We not just come.”

As far as his career is concerned, Mole comes prepared. Throughout his journey, he has imbibed the stories of achievers, constantly reading about Osei Kwame Despite as well as Jay Z.  He also names Nas, Lil Wayne, and Sarkodie (who habitually single-handedly sell out arenas) as influences. Mole sees himself eventually elevated to the stratosphere of the aforementioned—who reside at the apex of the apex. It is why, if today, a thousand people chant back his songs at functions, he’s buoyed by the confidence that consistency will secure him twice that number in a year, and tenfold in subsequent years, till he can headline his own show like his idols.  It is only at this point when global brands like Coca Cola and Nike are on his heels for endorsement that he will wholeheartedly accept the adjective of celebrity. “If you be human being wey u dey do something, you for move on, you for get that feeling…that high spirit. If today I drop song wey two hundred people spy in a month, tomorrow I go make sure say five hundred go watch in a month. If today I take one 3Music Award (he’s current holder of the Next Rated Act prize), I go make sure say next year, I go take like 3 at least. So e dey. Whatever you dey do biaa nu, everybody for get that feeling say he for go higher.”

Mole holds the avid belief that if one truly desires something, no obstacle should be enough to discourage him. After all, people talk. When he embarked on his current path, detractors said: “Mole this thing, shorn!”

 He paid no mind to them, and is reaping from that decision.

“We realize we listen to people keep; people dey tame we too much, so from that time wey I see say no, I no go be tamable again, because people just dey talk out of fear.”

We return briefly to his “Bibii Ba” appearance, via which we tackle the primacy of lyricism. Part of the reason sixteen bars glistened most on that joint, one would wager, is that, unlike a number of his colleagues on the record, he did not obsess about proving his aptitude with the fast-paced rap style. Rather, he ensured vivid elocution of his spiel, making it easy to completely chew on his punchlines: meat and bone. An additional technique comprising clever punning and practical wisdoms guaranteed that his submission—in its entirety—was the most impactful.

Lyricism is a prerequisite of true hip-hop, emphasizes Mole, as are a unique style, and philosophy. If you have all these sorted, “eno go be tough give you,” observes Mole, who somehow remains reticent about the suggestion that his “Bibii Ba” performance is what truly courted him mainstream notice. He places it a spot below “Mensah.” Mole’s first-ever recording with Arthur, “Mensah” was created without a premeditated concept. One evening, they both happened to be in the studio together. Producer KaySo randomly played the beat to them. Both rappers connected instantly. The result of that chemistry is the song.

Where he comes from, there are “No Gentlemen Allowed.” It’s what both his clique and imprint run by. Like “street,” this expression too bears a definition quite different from what you think. He expatiates thus: In Ghana, when the term “gentleman” is mentioned, the image it conjures up is an educated suit-and-tie—wearing person.  However, the way the system is set up, not everyone will realistically have access to higher education. For people who are tossed aside by the educational system, but who still nurture desire of breaking the poverty cycles they come from, there are other respectable ways of making a living, and classrooms should never get in the way of one’s quest to succeed.  “This movement be just to encourage people say, make them not look down on demma selves like the society dey do. Make them comot demma eye then do demma tin, because success go fit happen for anywhere. People dey work on the street, then later, they employ university graduates.

No gentlemen? No problem, then.  Mole and his circle have no qualms proving that they can be achievers nonetheless.  

Unavoidable in the arc of a street disciple enjoying appreciable success, there will come a time when Mole will be accused of “using and dumping” the streets when he actualizes, a time when people would say “you dawg the street.” What would be Mole’s antidote for this?

It’s quite simple, really. It’s like the analogy he cited earlier in our sit down.

“I be that guy wey I get good heart for the less privileged people,” he says. As far as he’s concerned, that will never change.  If today, he’s offering food to a hundred destitute people, that number will double next year, and so on, “just say e go catch some time I no go fit come myself. And if you dey understand life, you go know say Mole still get heart, but the people wey not dey understand life go talk say Mole dawg the street.”

In the end, this much is true: You can take the man from the street, but good luck draining the streets from the DNA of an act like Mole, who clutches to it like an “aposor.”

 “Nobody go fit separate the street from me,” the rapper’s eyes twinkle assuredly. Thus, our conversation comes to a close.

In the brief time that he has practised music professionally, he has mounted high-profile stages and collaborated with sought-after colleagues including Sarkodie, B4bonah, DopeNation, Qwamina MP, Medikal, Shaker, and Kwesi Arthur. He is due to publish Mr Amoah, another body of work in coming months.

Get Aposor Lover on SPOTIFY and BOOMPLAY

(Source: enewsgh.com)

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Meet the New Vocal Goddess – NaaNa Blu.

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Abigail Mensah, stage name NaaNa Blu is a Ghanaian musician who hails from Shama in the western region of Ghana. She completed her Senior High School education at Shama High School also in the western region and is a recent graduate Teacher of French from the prestigious University of Education, Winneba. She is multilingual and is fluent in Fante, Twi, English, and French.

NaaNa Blu is one of three children of Madam Comfort Mensah a baker and Nana Mensah Annan a fisherman. She has a brother and sister with whom she shares a great relationship.

NaaNa started her career as an artist signed to Darlings Records from 2015 to 2019 and was managed by Mimi Andani-Michaels. She amicably parted ways with the label in November 2019.

NaaNa Blu is currently signed to Quophimens Musiq, a Record Label and Talent Management Company. NaaNa has had the opportunity of performing at the Golden Movie Awards in 2016 and 2017, on DKB’s Point of View program and recently at the Phidel’s Fashion Week in Takoradi. She’s also performed with the Chickens band at Smokes and Barrel in Osu.

Although NaaNa has been performing music for a while now, she’s recently catapulted to the limelight with her cover of the award-winning artist, Kofi Kinaata’s “Things Fall Apart”. She has received a lot of positive reviews from music lovers both at home and abroad. The video has over a million views across social media platforms and is still trending.

https://youtu.be/3kWvEt2C5cQ

…“🔥🔥🔥 Shouts to @NaanaBluOnline 🙌🏾🙏🏾” - Kofi Kinaata - Award-winning Artist and song owner

“Cover of the week…” - Y-FM 107.9

“ This girl really sang @kinaatagh song soo well” - Asamoah Gyan - former captain, Ghana Black Stars

“…NaaNa if you work hard errrh, you'll sing at the queen’s birthday one day…” - Kwame Aplus - People Project Gh

NaaNa Blu describes her music as a fusion of Highlife and Afro Beats. She writes and performs predominantly in Fante which is her mother tongue infused with French and English. She is inspired by Asa, Bob Marley, Akosua Agyapong, Ewurama Bedu, Fella Kuti, Whitney Houston, and Sarkodie.

NaaNa is expected to become the next big thing in Ghana and her growing Fanbase is anticipating nothing but hit after hit from her camp. On any hidden talent, NaaNa can play a mean sound on the guitar and is a member of the fancy-dress troupe Supreme in Takoradi.

Written By: Angelina Taylor

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WALE & JIDENNA: How the American Artistes Maintain Relationship With Their African Roots.

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These American-based stars have constantly searched for their blackness in music and other places.

Artistes who have a multi-cultural background usually draw inspiration from this. Depending on their relationship, the product of this inspiration can be conflictual, or blissful. In the world today, many blacks outside Africa paint a philosophically obscure picture of Africa. Many of these are quick to label it Africa “the Motherland” – in other words, a heavenly place of no earthquakes and wars.

One problem: Africa isn’t heaven – hell, there’s no “Africa”. The continent, one of fifty-four countries, is the second most populated in the world, and attaching a “one” status to it is demeaning at worst. Yet, there’s music, which binds Africa, even as the dangerous politics which terrorize its nations threatens to divide it. More so, music reaches outside Africa connecting with blacks, sharing with them, their lost sound and history. In recent years, this has blown into the “Afrobeats to the World” movement which has witnessed the international success of artistes like Tiwa Savage, Burna Boy, Wizkid, and Davido.

There are also another set of connecting points: first generation Africans, who were born in the West or have lived there the most. Nigerian-born artistes Jidenna and Wale, represent this set. Naturally, their music (and off-studio moves) reflects their love for the country and its culture. Like custodians, over the years, they’ve called on their African background to serve as inspiration for their music.

Jidenna

“Classic Man” introduced Jidenna to the Nigerian audience. It was a successful one, but one more popular outside the shores of Nigeria. In Nigeria, it was his 2017 debut album “The Chief” that made him truly popular amongst folks of the West African country. The album was rooted firmly in Nigerian aesthetics, and its first words even, is a disciplinary appropriation of Nigerian elders – parents and all.

Jidenna’s insistent grasp to the culture of his motherland is reflected in the album, its Sahari-esque drum patterns and wild horns and African wise sayings. There was “Adaora,” a moving ballad (its first seconds) held by the vocals of Jidenna. A name native to the Igbo tribe, Jidenna’s love interest had no other option but to be black and African. Igbo, especially.

Till this day, Jidenna seems to be an artiste who finds fulfilment in seeking Nigeria, and finding it in music. The meaning of his name lends divine perspective to his artistic interests. Translated, “Jidenna” means “Hold onto the father”. Perhaps, the insatiable thirst for Nigerian tastes.

Alongside his breakout song, Jidenna’s rise saw him glossy and embossed on magazines. His style, a curious marriage of African and European prints, have earned him many admirers. Ever one to embrace his origins, the intent behind the picture that has cut across continents isn’t hard to see. Jidenna loves Nigeria, and he’s eager to show it.

Currently, the 34 year-old artiste is on his second album. Titled “85 to Africa,” the album is more expansive in the sense that its influences are more varied. Whereas his debut borrowed from the cultural hubs of Wisconsin and his native Igbo tribe, 85 is a more robust album, a marker of Jidenna’s willingness to expand the frontiers of his artistry. In an interview, he had this to say:

“I’ve always toyed with the idea of creating a kind of sound highway across the Atlantic Ocean with my music. I think it’s so important for the diaspora to feel connected, so the album is supposed to feel like a road trip across our various experiences. 85 to Africa isn’t just a country or even one continent. We were in Nigeria, Ethiopia, Swaziland, South Africa, and Ghana, but we also started out [in] Atlanta.”

A vehicle of some sorts, “85 to Africa” was Jidenna’s trusted vehicle to spread the music of the motherland. His first album was the proverbial return. In his second album, two years later, he’s stripped himself of the three-piece suits and clean beards, and sporting braids now. And tattoos. And muscles. His music is strengthened, guided by his freedom from the branding schemes of his former label. In another interview, Jidenna’s reveals 85 as the album he’s always wanted to make. And in putting out the album, he was psychologically positioned to make an album which joins hands with Nigeria, digging the gold from its trenches – experiences and all.

https://youtu.be/DdeKOG22gNU

The first track, “Worth the Weight,” features the enigmatic Seun Kuti (on a sample). Interluding his verses, was a spoken word about the end of the domination of the Oyinbo, another name for a white person. This energy is reflected throughout the album, as in eleven tracks, Jidenna’s philosophy of Pan African unity is reiterated.

85 to Africa, though it features Mr. Eazi as its only African-based artiste, is firmly rooted in the music of Nigeria and in particular, Africa. Highlife drums and Afrobeats chants rise from beneath, the production smoky, Jidenna’s raps worthy fire in itself. Revealed, Africa, connected through the words spoken by the man born Jidenna Theodore Mobisson; the production of Ghanaian-born Nana Kwabena cannot be understated too, as for most parts of the album, its pristine quality is the perfect sparring partner for Jidenna’s raps.

Wale

Maybac Music Group veteran Olubowale Victor Akintemehin is also Nigerian-born. Although easily gleaned from his names, Wale is “less showy” (compared to Jidenna) about his Nigerian origins.

Born in Washington DC, the rapper had a loose sense of Pan African consciousness, with Nigerians affiliating with Folarin (as he’s fondly called) because of his growing success within the American music industry.

Wale, perhaps, due to his experimental tendencies, has established connection with Nigeria through its artistes. In 2013, he first explored this with “Drop,” a collaboration with Wizkid, Africa’s man at the moment, who so happened to strike an artistic connection with Wale when he toured America in 2012. Instagram pictures and all, it was clear that Wale and Wizkid had hit it off, and while starting a personal friendship that continues to this day, it would pique Wale’s interest in making more Afrobeats–inspired music.

Wizkid would again, collaborate with Wale, handling chorus duties on the summery “My Love”. In 2017 album “Shine,” another Afrobeats star, Davido gets a feature on “Fine Girl”. Olamide was on the song, marking his second collaboration with Wale, after “Make Us Proud,” released in 2014.

That song, which sampled a popular advert on African football legend Nwankwo Kanu (“Papilo I know say one day you go make us proud”) is the perfect anecdote for explaining Wale’s relationship with Nigeria. There, he’s viewed as a foreign expatriate in America, whose glory reflects on his parents’ country. We are, like cheering fans, telling him to make us proud. And while there are few safari-sounding songs in his six-album discography, Wale wears his Nigerian on his sleeve.

On social media, he’s present in matters of the contemporary, as it affects the teeming youths of the country who wield their phones as their fiercest weapon. He posts Nigerian food (among others), too, cultural connoisseur that he is.

Although in different ways, Jidenna and Wale represent black men loving themselves (and their artistry). This love, prompted by their relationship with Africa, also connects them to the world. And wow, what a thing to see.(pan african music)

https://youtu.be/jzf1GbCf6G4
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MEET THE COMPOZERS: The Band Elevating Ghana’s Culture In Europe.

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UK (www.georgebritton.com) - The Compozers are a group of young four black British boys who believe music can be used to transform the lives of people around the globe. Music is a universal language. As #ThePoeple'sBand, they use their talents to reach out to those who are unreachable through the touch of their instruments. They have travelled the world doing what they do best, performing with various award winning artists such as Wizkid and Fuse ODG who have a. Through the production of their annual show 'A Night with the Compozers', the Compozers, truly "let the music do the talking".

Nana Pokes - (BASS)

Nana 'Pokes' Ntorinkansah was born in Enfield north London where he began his love for music. From the age of four, he started playing drums and keyboard which led and grew to his love to music which spiked his love for the bass, in which we know him for today.

Throughout his education he has been actively invovled with the craft of music, from playing the drums throughout his primary school life and in his church, where he has religiously been playing since he was around five years old. From playing in the school christmas plays to playing for singnig assemblies, Nana Pokes love for music grew and grew as the years went on, which made him want to learn and develop other instruments such as the keybard and bass.

Being in a musical and strong christian family, his involvement in the church has always been priority; and with the use of his ability to play various instruments became a key contribution to his development as a musician today.

As a musician, it is always key to hold various musical influences, and Nana Pokes is none the less inspired and driven by a variety of different artists and entrepreneurs such as Snarky Puppy, Fifteen hundred or nothing, Kirk Franklin, Ron Kanole who have shaped and are continuously shaping his musical perspective today.

He is the Co-CEO of a Entertainment company called Decadence Entertainment in which manages the Compozers which he began with his long time friend Brian Boateng because of their love for arts and performing arts this also contributed to the sole idea surrounding the development of a company such as Decadence. They developed this organisation during his time at university which was driven by his love for music and the entertainment industry.

Watch The Compozers Ghana 62nd Independence Concert Highlights

https://youtu.be/tWCk_1xf5GE

David Melodee - (KEYBOARD/KEYTAR)

David 'Melodee' Ohene-Akrasi was born in North London on the 19th October where he endured his love and his electrifying ear for the dynamic sounds of the keyboard and keytar which contribute to the collective authenticity of 'compozers'. Throughout his education, he always fond himself falling for music and the technical aspect which surrounds it, steaming from his love for gospel music through his involvement with his church. As his mother was in the church choir, he became exposed to the idea of music from a very young age, which led him to indulge in the drums.

Throughout his primary school years, where they would frequently hold music lessons, is where David realized his talent and gift in which he has for music. From this original love and appreciation for the art, he became more and more involved within the music scene, were from the ages of eleven and twelve he became giging at various events where he wold interact with various other musicians through the enrollment of the music school which he was put in by his parents.

As he grew older, and moved to secondary school, he developed the ear and eye for music through the use of Youtube, which taught him various skillful skills and runs, in which pushed him to go and join his mothers church band, where he resigns. When he hit the age of seventeen, he started gigging with the boys which lead to the formation of The Compozers.

With the assistance of his love for various artists such as Michael Jackson, and his ability to be so diverse within his music, with the ability to still appeal to a vast audience, his ability to captivate the audience with his talent inspires David to aim to achieve the same with the use of his instrument.

Watch The Compozers - Afrobeats Medley in the 1Xtra Live Lounge.

https://youtu.be/Qe8LtDpXwkU?list=RDQe8LtDpXwkU

​Stephen - (DRUMS)

Stephen 'Drummerboy' Asamoah-Duah was born on the 31st Decemeber to a Ghanaian family. He attended St Ignatius college where he obtained his GCSE's including a GCSE in music which was driven by he being awarded Young Drummer of the Year 2011.

Stephen developed his love and began to play the drums from the age of three, which grew and grew as the years progressed, which led to gain a GCSE in the craft. His love and ambition for business and entrepreneurship also pushed him to study Business in college to aid in his understanding and development of collaborating his passion and skill into a business.

Winning the young drummer of the year award really made a large impact on his life and drove him to truly pursue his love and passion for music. This allowed him to develop greater confidence in his ability to become one of the greatest musicians out there.

Through his active involvement with his local community, he became an ambassador to the Enfield Sounds Great charity which is run by Enfield council, which illustrates his love for not only music for himself, but his need to help the younger generation truly utilize their skills and persue their career like he did.

Through his years drummers from gig to gig, performing in various churches is where he also developed the relationship in which he holds today within the musician industry. Here is where he came in contact with Charlie Biggz, Nana Pokes and David Melodee, which developed the group in which we know today.

Watch Davido O2 Arena Intro Featuring The Compozers - Aye

https://youtu.be/-NqJHv7ewBo

Charlie Biggz - (KEYBOARD)

Charlie 'Biggz' Mensah-Bonsu was born on the 6th July in North London where he attended and achieved the majority of his educational achievements. He began playing the keyboard from the age of thirteen in 2005, which was brought onto him from his father who wanted him to stay out of trouble and be proactive in his life by learning an instrument. With this, Charles used the keyboard as a 'safe place' in which he can go to and allow his creative mind to go wild.

During his secondary school years, he would attend the music room during breaks and lunch times to go and record beats and tracks, which sparked his love for producing and production as a whole. As he went onto college, he began developing beats and track for various friends, which created a name for himself in the music industry.

Alongside producing tracks for various artists and friends, being a christian, he was also an active musician contributing to his church band which truly shaped him into the musician he is today, by developing his musical understand of the various dynamics of a band choir and the understanding of being under leadership and the various perks which are attached with it.

Charlie Biggz is seen to be one of exquist musicians out there as he has the ability to fuse the attributes of a singer and nicorporate harmonic characteristics to create voicings that replicate sound sand approach similar to one wo uses their voice. Carlie Biggz is what extraordinary looks like, which contributes to the key phenomena which makes up the Compozers today.

Watch Koffee ft The Compozers - Ye LIVE (Burna Boy cover)

https://youtu.be/sIqiZ4PnBLM

The Compozers will be performing at the Afronation Festival live in Ghana, December.

On social media, they're @compozers

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MEET JUNIOR PSL: Young Ghanaian Rapper Championing Road Safety With His Songs.

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Ghanaian hip hop artist Junor PSL has joined forces with the Road Safety and multimedia communications company PSLmuzik group to promote road safety during the upcoming festive season. The lad has released a single on traffic safety titled, "Road Safety", campaign intends to reduce fatalities in a country where thousands of people lose their lives on the roads every year.

This is in response to road traffic accidents around the country, 90 percent of which according to Minister of Transport and Infrastructure Development are caused by human error. Released last month, the song will be used as a campaign tool against drunk driving, driving without a licence, failure to adhere to road rules and driving while fatigued among other mishaps that have caused loss of lives and injuries on the country’s roads.

Junior PSL is determined to use his voice and experiences in ensuring that the roads are safe for all that use them. According to him, in the song, he will hold road safety campaigns around the country. As a musician I feel it is my duty to educate and inform people on pressing issues affecting our society. PSLmuzik group signee implored drivers to be cautious on the roads during the festive season, and urged the government to fix bad roads in the country.

Watch Video below;

https://youtu.be/loyVvq2_a84

Kingsley Baffour Awuah aka Junior_PSL, a member of PSLmuzik group ( consisting of Scrip_T and Pappy_PSL) He officially started music around 2008 and released 1st official single (Foowaah) on 2016 after a couple of mixtapes. He studied Architecture at Central University in the 2018 and now working as a recording artiste and an Architect.

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