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Kojo Manuel Celebrates Asamoah Gyan & Sarkodie at True Music Africa

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If
you were not at Carbon last Saturday, 5th October then you missed a
whole lot! The event was organised by Europe’s Number One Whiskey,
Ballantines and celebrated African music on the night. The show was
headlined by King Promise, Kwesi Arthur, DarkoVibes, Kojo Manuel, DJ
Vyrusky, DJ Mic Smith and iPhone DJ.

Kojo
Manuel who was the host, wore an Asamoah Gyan jersey with his famous
number 3 written boldly at the back! This got a lot of reactions and he
was quoted on twitter saying, “..if we don’t celebrate our heroes, who
will?”, also adding”…also, we day come play!”Very impressive to have him show love to the All Time Top Scorer for the Black Stars.

Kojo
Manuel also announced mid-party, Sarkodie’s Best International Flow
award news when it had just broke out and caused a great reaction from
party lovers who jammed to back to back Sarkodie songs from DJ Mic Smith
to celebrate the win!All in all I’d say the Ghana flag was pretty high that night as his energy was one that should be commended!

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NUDITY IN THE ENTERTAINMENT SECTOR: Destructive Or Constructive?

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Nowadays, African superstars love to show skin, whether it's in a music video, on stage or on the red carpet. Lately, nudity has caused controversy and quite a number of explicit videos have been censored or banned. Critics say watching African music videos now is the easiest and unconscious way of turning yourself on. They are now a subtle instrument for seduction.

It’s no secret nudity sells. Most fans are excited to see nudes. Some African stars have also gone wild on social media adopting nudity as a strategy to gain popularity. What is more, this seems to have negative impacts on the younger generation. Sex tapes and nude leaks are a normal phenomenon amongst young people. Unfortunately, a few that can’t stand the shame after a scandal end up taking their lives. Also, video directors are getting more expressive and are coming up with explicit sexual contents. Gone are the days when nudity in videos are shown in abstract, today, directors give us all the obscene details that raise moral questions.

Some years ago, Nigerian Actress Christabel Ekeh dropped a bombshell online to add her name to the black list. Reports speculate she’s off upstairs, however, her family insists Christabel is sane. Popular entertainers such as Kenya’s Avril Nyambura and Boity from South Africa say their leaks were due to hacks, Desire Luzinda was little known in Uganda, but when her nude photos went viral, she became an instant hit. Dj Crème was famous in Kenya not for his disc jockey skills, but a 5-minute sex tape leak.

When she leaked her nude photos, Ghanaian singer, Deborah Vanessa claimed she accrued $8,000 for her leaks. Also, that of Ghanaian actors, Moesha Budong, Efia Odo, Jessica Larny amongst others broke the internet. According to Jessica Larny, who is also a model, “If going half-naked or doing these shoots will put food on her table which it does anyway, she will do it, since it’s a certified profession, adding that shooting semi-nude photos pays better than what she makes from acting in a whole year.

Though we live in a society that treats female public nudity as a moral offense or a cause for concern and discussion, but not as a source of non-sexual female power, others believe nudity empowers. Truly, female nudity has power, and majority can’t resist the gaze, but at the end, It’s about choice, and what you choose to do, whether it is for a campaign or protest, for art or simply self-expression or self-love. Well, there are powerful, provocative and intelligent ways females can use their bodies, without having to bare them, however, the big question is… has money become the ultimate goal rather than using creativity as a tool to fix the society?(FlashAfrica)

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Junior_PSL _ Poverty Go Die _ (Prod. By King O & DjaeBanky)

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Falz, Patoranking – Girls (Official Video)

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THE AFROBEAT INVASION: Has The Genre From Africa Put Jamaican Dance-hall Under Pressure.

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Afrobeat is the new sound of Africa, and there speculations that the genre as put dancehall under pressure, as it continues to gain popularity worldwide. Afro-beats “take inspiration from its African roots and is combined with the sounds of rap, reggae/dancehall, and even RnB.” History suggests Afrobeat began in Ghana in the early 1920s, however, the term was coined by the late Nigerian music legend, Fela Kuti in the 1960s. Fela Kuti popularized Afrobeat within and outside Nigeria. An article published in the UK Voice last year stated Afro-beat is now "rivaling or even exceeding the popularity of Jamaican dance-hall" in the international market.

“Listening to then versus dancehall now, it's called the same genre but the beats now are so much different from what they used back then. Maybe what most persons define as dancehall sounded like one drop in the very beginning, then a synthesized kind of one drop, until it moved into a version a little different from that and a phase where it seems like soca had a bigger influence on it. And now Afro-beat is borrowing from dancehall, and vice versa,” says Renowned Billboard journalist Pat Meschino. Pat further adds that the fallacy that “dancehall is thriving in mainstream markets like the US may come from that fusion of the genres, which might see some persons identifying Afro-beat as dancehall.”

According to Sean 'Contractor' Edwards, head of Contractor Music Group in Jamaica, besides its enjoyable rhythm, which makes people feel good and want to dance, Afrobeat contains cleaner lyrics and a vibe to which people are drawn than dancehall. "Afrobeat has more melody to it than regular dancehall, so it's something that people can dance to, as well as the lyrics are more radio- and party-friendly. Many of them are love songs, not violent lyrics," he said. Though Sean acknowledges Afrobeat is popular now, particularly in dancehall strongholds, he’s of the opinion that Afrobeat has not taken over from the dancehall genre.

Prominent Jamaican record label owner, Julian Jones-Griffiths disclosed in an interview with The Gleaner, that many Afrobeat artistes are on the rise and the genre is being supported by the international market. And in the case of dancehall, few dancehall artistes and songs are being shown the same love.

"Davido, Wiz Kid, Burna Boy and many more have all signed with majors recently, and there has definitely been a rush to sign hot Afrobeat artistes by major label A&Rs (artistes and repertoire). There is not that same desire to sign Jamaican dancehall artistes currently," Jones-Griffiths revealed. "One thing I do see with all the Afrobeat acts is that they are very unified. There isn't that infamous 'crab in a barrel' mentality afflicting their industry that everyone bemoans in dancehall. They are also ahead of us in terms of streaming numbers on Spotify, etc. Streaming is a real issue for us. Spotify is not available here, and it seems that dancehall fans all over don't really consume the music in these platforms. We're falling behind in an area the rest of the world is leading," he added.

As Afrobeats continues to experience tremendous growth globally, Sean and Jones-Griffiths urge Jamaican dancehall artistes to push for collabos with afrobeat singers to achieve much success on the international market. Dancehall acts like Demarco, who featured Akon on his joint, “No Wahala”, Popcaan and especially Busy signal, who has the habit of cooking joints with Afro beat rhythms - Same Way, Expensive Order, Professionally, and giving mentions to Africa in his songs (Dolla Van, That’s how we Do it) have already set the ball rolling. (Flash Africa)

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