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Huawei Smartphone Sales Hit Amid US Curbs.

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Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei has said international sales of the Chinese telecoms giant’s handsets have sunk 40% in the past month as a US-led backlash against the firm intensifies.

Speaking at the firm’s headquarters, Mr Ren also said the company would slash production by $30bn (£23.9bn).

Last month, the US put Huawei on a list of companies that American firms cannot trade with unless they have a licence.

The move marked an escalation in efforts by Washington to block Huawei.

The US argues that the Chinese company – the world’s largest maker of telecoms equipment and the second biggest smartphone maker – poses a security risk.

“In the coming two years, the company will cut production by $30bn,” Mr Ren said at a panel discussion at the firm’s headquarters in Shenzhen.

*Why Huawei matters in five charts

*Huawei: US blacklist will harm billions of consumers

Sales are now expected to remain flat at $100bn in 2019 and 2020. Earlier this year, Huawei had predicted sales of about $125bn for 2019.

However, Mr Ren said the company would “regain [its] vitality” in 2021.

He also said that while overseas smartphone sales had dropped sharply, in China growth remained “very fast”.

Spending on research and development would not be cut, Mr Ren added, despite the anticipated hit to the firm’s finances.

The Huawei founder had previously downplayed the impact of the US restrictions on the Chinese firm.

However, the actions by the US have prompted tech companies around the world to retreat from Huawei.

Google barred Huawei from some updates to the Android operating system, meaning new designs of Huawei smartphones are set to lose access to some Google apps.

Japan’s Softbank and KDDI have both said they will not sell Huawei’s new handsets for now.

UK-based chip designer ARM told staff it must suspend business with Huawei, according to internal documents obtained by the BBC.

Surveillance fears
Washington’s clampdown on Huawei is part of a broader push-back against the company, over worries about using its products in next-generation 5G mobile networks.

Several countries have raised concerns that Huawei equipment could be used by China for surveillance, allegations the company has vehemently denied.

*Should we worry about Huawei?

*Trump declares emergency over IT threats

Huawei has said its work does not pose any threats and that it is independent from the Chinese government.

However, some countries have blocked telecoms companies from using Huawei products in 5G mobile networks.

So far the UK has held back from any formal ban.

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Huawei Reportedly Helped North Korea Build Out 3G Network In Secret.

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A new report could ultimately prove another bombshell in Huawei’s on-going conflicts with the U.S. government. New documents obtained by The Washington Post tie the Chinese hardware giant to North Korea’s commercial 3G wireless network.

If proven, the ties would be yet more fodder for the U.S., which has already dinged the company over charges of violating Iran sanctions. The government has also been investigated potential ties between Huawei and North Korea for years, though concrete links have apparently remained elusive.

This latest report arrives by way of a former Huawei employee, with confirmation and supporting documents from other sources who have also requested to remain anonymous for fear of retribution. For its part, Huawei has stated that it has “no business presence” in the embattled country.

“Huawei is fully committed to comply with all applicable laws and regulations in the countries and regions where we operate, including all export control and sanction laws and regulations,” it said in a statement offered to the press. Notably, the statements appear to apply primarily to its current business offerings, while declining to comment on the past.

The specifics of the dealings are a touch complicated. According to the documents, Huawei partnered with Panda International Information Technology, a state-owned Chinese communications company. Huawei reportedly used the firm to send networking equipment to the country in order to launch wireless carrier, Koryolink over a decade ago.

The company has been under additional scrutiny recently as carriers have begun to roll out 5G networks across the globe. We’ve reached out to Huawei for additional comment.

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Instagram Wants Opening Your DMs To Feel Like ‘Walking Into A Party’.

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It’s incredible that Kaitlyn Tiffany and I haven’t yet asked why people slide into other people’s direct messages, but that ends today. On this week’s episode of Why’d You Push That Button?, we want to hear love stories and stories of failed courtship attempts. We ask why people slide into DMs, and then we process how the direct message’s connotation has changed over time. 

We chat with our friend Blake who has slid into multiple DMs, as well as Tasbeeh Herwees, who called DMs the “new little black book” in MEL. Then we talk to a man named Thomas who met his boyfriend on Twitter through the DMs. We love love!

Finally, we take all our questions and thoughts to Connor Hayes, the director of product for Instagram messaging, who explains what the company has seen when it comes to DM behavior and what the future looks like for DMs. Notably, he says that Instagram wants to feel like a cool party where you can talk to all your friends, especially once Facebook merges all its messaging products together. This intimidates me, to be honest. Sometimes I don’t want to be at a party.

“If we do our job well, at the end of the day Instagram, when you open it up, is going to feel a lot more like walking into a party and hanging out with your friends than it is today, and we see messaging as a big part of that,” he says.

Listen to the episode above, and you can subscribe to the show anywhere you typically get your podcasts. To make it easy for you, we’ve also got our usual places linked: Apple Podcasts, Pocket Casts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, and our RSS feed.

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Toyota Edges Closer Toward Creating A Space-Traveling Moon Rover.

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Toyota just moved one step closer toward pioneering an RV fit for space travel.

Just days ahead of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on Saturday, the automaker announced that it has officially signed a three-year commitment agreement with Japan's space agency JAXA to develop a pressurized moon rover set to launch a decade from now. 

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Toyota on July 16 released a timeline detailing its plans to bring the project to life. This comes four months after the automaker announced that it was looking into partnering with JAXA to develop the fuel cell-powered behemoth. 

Slide 2 of 7: Toyota and JAXA have been jointly studying the concept of a manned, pressurized rover since May 2018. The company's want to launch the vehicle to the moon in 2029.
Toyota and JAXA have been jointly studying the concept of a manned, pressurized rover since May 2018. The company's want to launch the vehicle to the moon in 2029.

The preliminary timetable has Toyota and JAXA finalizing specifications for a prototype during the fiscal year 2019. Manufacturing would begin in 2020 and testing is expected to happen in 2021. 

The plan covers almost every year from now through 2027. In 2022, the partners expect to start testing the prototype's driving systems and by 2024, Toyota wants to start designing the actual flight model. The duo is aiming to launch the rover in 2029.

Slide 3 of 7: The goal is to achieve a sustainable future on the moon, and eventually Mars. JAXA wants to use the rover to find frozen water on the surface of the moon initially.
The goal is to achieve a sustainable future on the moon, and eventually Mars. JAXA wants to use the rover to find frozen water on the surface of the moon initially.

To achieve these goals, Toyota established Lunar Exploration Mobility Works, a department dedicated specifically to the rover. The Japanese car company's new workforce division will grow to about 30 employees by the end of 2019, according to a press release.

A few months back, Toyota unveiled conceptual renderings of the six-wheeled vehicle which calls for enough living space to comfortably support two occupants. 

The spacecraft would also enable astronauts to live inside it without wearing space suits.

Slide 4 of 7: Toyota says its rover is roughly the size of two small shuttle buses. It has 42.6 cubic feet of interior space, enough for a two-astronaut crew, or four in an emergency.
Toyota says its rover is roughly the size of two small shuttle buses. It has 42.6 cubic feet of interior space, enough for a two-astronaut crew, or four in an emergency.

The vehicle is expected to be be at least 20 feet long, 17 feet wide and 12.4 feet high. The electric machine would be powered by fuel cells, which use clean power generation methods and emit only water. The rover would have a lunar surface range of more than 6,200 miles, according to Toyota. 

JAXA wants to use the futuristic mobile home to help astronauts explore the lunar poles in search of frozen water. The agency also sets its eyes on using the technology to explore other planets.

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Instagram Will Notify You Before Deactivating Your Account.

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Instagram is strengthening its moderation policies today and adding a new alert that will warn people who violate rules when their account is close to being deleted.

The alert will show users a history of the posts, comments, and stories that Instagram has had to remove from their account, as well as why they were removed. “If you post something that goes against our guidelines again, your account may be deleted,” the page reads.

Instagram will give users a chance to appeal its moderation decisions directly through the alert, rather than having to go through its help page on the web. Only some types of content will be able to be appealed at first (such as pictures removed for nudity or hate speech), and Instagram plans to expand the available content appeal types over time.

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The change will help clarify for users why they’re in trouble and should remove the shock of suddenly finding that your account has vanished. While it’s likely that a great number of banned accounts are removed for obvious rule violations, Instagram — like its parent company Facebook — has regularly had moderation problems when it comes to nudity and sexuality, where users have had photos removed for posting pictures of breastfeeding or period blood. This update won’t prevent those mistakes (those types of photos are supposed to be allowed), but it would make appealing the decision easier.

In addition to the new alert, Instagram is also going to give its moderating team more leeway to ban bad actors. Instagram’s policy has been to ban users who post “a certain percentage of violating content,” but it’ll now ban people who repeatedly violate its policies within a window of time, too. The specifics here are all as vague as ever, as Instagram doesn’t want to offer details and let bad actors game the system, but it sounds like it could lead to fewer problematic accounts slipping through on a technicality.

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