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BT Model Agency Flies Models To Italy For Milan Fashion Show 2019

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Ghanaian modeling agency BT Model Agency has flown two of its models to Italy to participate in a series of fashion shows.

The models Joy Ubeku and Nana Jukwa Someah-Kwaw are expected to showcase their talents at the Milan fashion show and the Prix fashion show whiles in Italy.

Speaking to the CEO of BT Model Agency Nana Ama Bosompemaa, she revealed her excitement of seeing her models grace the runways on the international stage.

She also believes her models are ready for any show because of the level of professional training they undergo at BT Model Agency.

Models Joy Ubeku and Nana Jukwa have walked on fashion shows like Runway Ghana International show, Glamour West Africa Show and KDV fashion show among others.

BT Model Agency is a Ghanaian modeling agency and event management firm which specializes in scouting and training individuals to be professional models.

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Designers & Models

GlennSamm Wins YEA 2019 Fashion Personality of the Year.

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Ghanaian walking artist, GlennSamm won the fashion personality of the year category at the Youth Excellence Awards 2019 held at Silver Star Tower, November 16, 2019.

The fashion icon with a tremendous global appeal, known in real life as Glenn Samuel Semakor won the enviable award in a stiff competition that had other equally deserving fashion super-powers in the category.

Addressing the audience and supporters of the event, the Afro-futuristic extended his heartfelt appreciation all his fans and other collaborators within the fast-rising creative hub, Kvngsofthenewschool who helped him attain this laurel.

Glenn further urged his supporters to be on the lookout for new mind-boggling art installations which will transcend the conscious and positive image of Africa to the world.

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Senegalese Fashion Designer, Sarah Diouf Vows To Train Local Tailors, Artisans.

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Senegalese fashion designer Sarah Diouf, whose Tongoro designs were catapulted to fame after being spotted on Beyonce, has vowed to to expand production in Senegal and train local tailors to translate her brand’s success into jobs for artisans.

Founded in 2016, Tongoro is a ready-to-wear label dedicated to the development of Senegal. The label made headlines last year when Beyonce wore Tongoro patterned dresses and wide-leg pants on vacation in Italy last year.

The 31-year-old Dakar-based designer was then asked to make a custom design for Beyonce, who wore a Tongoro suit and dressed her dancers in its jewellery in her “Spirit” music video for “The Lion King” film.

The Senegalese capital of Dakar is known for its vibrant fashion scene but most tailors are self-taught, work on street corners and have no way to reach a wider customer base.

Rising demand for “Made in Africa” fashion has not yet benefited many people in Senegal, according to Sarah Diouf, who employs only seven tailors so far. With more local training and online sales, she thinks Senegal’s clothing industry can grow.

Sarah Diouf said: “For me, the Beyonce storyline is opening the conversation and opening doors.

“We have so much talent, but I think we just need a little bit more structure to take it to the next level.”

By sourcing its materials from across the African continent and working with local tailors, Tongoro’s long-term goal is to create “a new dynamic for Africa-based manufacturing”, as well as foster the economic and social development of artisanal workers in Western Africa.

After Tongoro was featured in Elle and Vogue magazines, Sarah Diouf recognised its potential to sell worldwide. She plans to scale up next year and eventually open a production facility with 100 to 150 tailors.

She added: “It’s very important for me to create an ecosystem where everyone can benefit from what I do.”

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Ghanaian Top Model Prisca Abah Speaks At Sustainable Rice Platform Conference In Thailand.

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UN Youth Ambassador SDG 12 Prisca Abah has addressed delegates at the 2nd Global Sustainable Rice Conference and Exhibition held at United Nation Conference Centre in Bangkok, Thailand.

Ms Abah highlighted the best way to involve and engage unskilled youth in the rice value chain which she said is critical for the reduction of poverty in Africa and across the world.

The top model who is also the UN Youth Ambassador talked about Farming families, Training and extension program, senior extension workers and Young field data monitors.

The beautiful Ms Abah has had an amazing experience of working with some of the best designers, photographers and also walks on some of the biggest shows in Africa, including Planefocusgh; Wale Visuals (Nigeria); Jameswyner (Nigeria); Vine imagery; Frame it photography; JoehSey photography; and Dwain Hubbard (South Africa). Ejiro Amos Tafiri; Çharlotte prive; Melanie_Crane; Bello Edu; Nicolinegh; Quophi Akotuah; Adeziwavade; Larry J; Nallem Clothing; among others.

Ms Abah also acquired a few acting skills to her career and has had the chance to work with African Screen legend, Yvonne Nelson on her movie titled – “In April”. She did a commercial with Bismark the joke for Storm energy drink, as well as ‘New Life Cream.’ Ms Abah was granted a diplomatic certificate from World Academy of Human science as a representing spokesperson in Ghana.

She's won multiple and notable awards, such as SSA(South South Achievers Awards )International Model Of the year 2019, GMIA (Ghana Modeling Industry Award)Top Model of the year 2018/2019, GOWA (Ghana Outstanding Woman Awards)Model Woman Of the year 2018 and Afroma Runway/Female Model Of the Year 2017.

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Meet The Senegalese Designer Making Math Chic.

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Who knew that math and fashion could work together so seamlessly? Apparently Diarra Bousso did, the self-described "Creative Mathematician" and mastermind behind DIARRABLU. The Senegalese serial entrepreneur and multidisciplinary artist left a career of trading on Wall Street to pursue design and it paid off. She has just been awarded a coveted spot as the Designer in Residence at the San Francisco Fashion Incubator for her innovative use of equations and algorithms in her beautiful designs.

The name DIARRABLU is a portmanteau of her own name and the color blue, representing the infinity and abundance of the ocean. The fall/winter collection "Linguère," named for the Wolof word for a royal female, launched earlier this week. Linguère pays tribute to the tradition of strong Senegalese females of antiquity—specifically the Jolof Empire of the 14th century from which Bousso descends. We caught up with her to ask a few questions about what it is like to merge the nerdy with the glamorous.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Nereya Otieno for OkayAfrica: When did the idea to start a fashion line first come to you? Did you foresee it when first leaving trading in Wall Street?

I wanted to have a fashion line since I was very little but it always felt like a far-fetched dream. When I was working on Wall Street, I got even more inspired and excited about the idea. I also was getting more involved in the creative scene through photography and blogging. When I left trading it was with the goal to start a fashion line right away, even though I had no experience in the field back then.

Did the idea of merging mathematics and algorithms with fashion come naturally to you? Or was it more of a stretch?

I always loved mathematics and liked the idea of using geometric shapes and cuts, but the idea of using algorithms didn't come until I joined the Mathematics Education program at Stanford. We had this amazing professor named Jo Boaler and her work was focused on Creative Mathematics. I was like "wow, what a cool way to describe one's work." I started brainstorming in my free time and started toying with the idea of using math in the design process itself and not just the cuts.

The designer pointing to her design credit on a photo of Kendall Jenner in VOGUE USA.
(Photo by Tijan Watt)

After graduation, I started graphing equations, creating shapes and getting really excited. By December 2018, I had generated hundreds of designs algorithmically and decided to work on a collection while in Dakar. We made the first prints and I decided this was going to be the new direction.

So, wait, yeah—how does your process actually work?

I use equations to graph lines, curves, parabolas, hyperbolas, basically anything that can be represented by a math equation and graphed. Then I focus on where those lines and curves meet, which creates kind of random shapes. Then we hand paint those shapes using a color scheme that I've chosen.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bt8xv7jF_3N/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

What do you think it means to use algorithms in instances of self expression and art?

I think it is very empowering. It is a merger of the authentic and the automatic that can be extremely rewarding. Math is limitless, numbers never end and the fact that it is my tool for creation makes me feel like the opportunities are endless. Sometimes, I can stay up all night after writing new algorithms and experimenting with all the iterations that can come out of it. By just changing one number in your equation of flipping the signs, you get a complete new set of patterns. It is so mind blowing!

Your current collection is meant to evoke feelings of the 14th century Jolof Empire, how does it feel to use such contemporary methods in order to create the past?

I have always been fascinated by the past. Perhaps because it is somehow mysterious and hard to grasp. Growing up, I was always excited to dress up on special days as a traditional Wolof princess. My grandma would share her old clothes and resize them for me and I would get traditional braids and jewelry. I am from the Wolof ethnic group in Senegal and my parents raised us with a lot of cultural and historical references. My dad would always tell us stories about our grandparents and mom secretly thinks she is the style heir of the family.

https://www.instagram.com/p/B2_sZ4dFlX9/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

Revisiting Senegal's past with a collection was very exciting. I wanted to evoke that sense of comfort, freedom and power in traditional wear while adhering to the color palette of the fauna and flora of the Jolof region in Senegal. Clothes are convertible and adjustable just like the traditional boubous and wrap skirts and colors follow an arid climate's palette of camel undertones and green accents. The algorithmic patterns are abstractions of animal inspired prints and have names like Gyraf and Zybra.

What do you think technologies like this mean for the future of fashion?

I think technologies like this have the potential to make fashion more efficient and circular. In our case, designing our prints algorithmically allows us to generate hundreds of options but only printing the ones that our audience responds to via social media. This has allowed us to reduce fabric inventory wastage by 80% and take a closer step towards sustainability.

https://www.instagram.com/p/B3jpVybFTnf/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

What's next for you and DIARRABLU?

The focus for me is to use this amazing opportunity to scale with the support of Silicon Valley tech executives through the program and expand both our online and store footprint to be able to reach more consumers around the world. We are also working on exciting initiatives to expand our design universe from clothing and accessories to art and interiors. Finally, working towards sustainability is a big goal for us with a focus on more circular solutions to textile design. I hope we keep growing and sharing our story of the intersection of tradition and algorithms with a larger audience.

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